Dec 012012
 

Alternative Christmas Trifle Recipe

Where I grew up the Christmas menu was (and probably still is):

  • Prawn Cocktail
  • Turkey and Trimmings
  • Trifle

The trifle was always ‘home made’ from a selection of ingredients including; a tin of peaches, jelly, UHT spray foam, and the obligatory silver balls!  I was never a fan of this trifle but I’m all grown up now and found a version that suits my taste.  Why not try it yourself and see what you think.

*Health warning – you will have to clean out the hen shed to burn up all the calories this contains*

Cranberry and Chocolate Trifle

This is a pleasure to look at as well as eat so make sure you make it in a deep glass bowl, to show of the layers of brown, white and ruby red.

Prepare everything 48 hours in advance to allow the sugary chocolate to become gooey and sticky and begin to soak into the layers of creamy cranberry.

  • 250g grated dark chocolate (55-70% cocoa)
  • 250g fresh wholemeal breadcrumbs
  • 200g unrefined demerara sugar
  • 2tbsp sieved cocoa
  • 1tbsp coffee granules
  • 600ml fresh double cream 
  • 300ml fresh single cream
  • 200ml crème fraiche
  • 250g jar of luxury cranberry sauce
  • a handful of dried cranberries

In a bowl combine 200g of the grated chocolate with the breadcrumbs, sugar, cocoa and coffee.  Stir well.  Whisk together the double and single cream until thick, but not stiff, then fold in the crème fraiche.

In a large glass bowl, place a third of the chocolate breadcrumbs in a level layer.  Top with a third of the cream and smooth it over.  Carefully add half of the jar of cranberry sauce, ensuring it is evenly distributed over the cream.  Continue to layer in the same manner: chocolate breadcrumbs, cream, then cranberry sauce, finishing with a layer of cream.  Cover and put in fridge for 48 hours.

Take out of fridge and sprinkle with silver balls (only kidding) grated chocolate and dried cranberries over the top.  Serve in small portions as this trifle is extremely rich.

 

Enjoy  :0)

 

 

 December 1, 2012  post archive, recipe Tagged with: , , , ,
Nov 302012
 
coloured willow and dog wood stems

Coloured willow stems for sale at fifesmallholder

It’s winter again and the coloured willows and dog woods that have been hidden by the other flowers and shrubs, now shine out in the garden.  I have been admiring them, and thinking about what I will do with them.  Some I will leave in the garden to enjoy, but will harvest the rest.  Some we sell, customers can come and gather their own, or we deliver within reasonable distances.  I also like to use them in my own Christmas Decorations  (such as wreaths and table decorations) but I also display them in house throughout winter, instead of supermarket flowers.  The smaller branches are put into a vase and will give me a long period of enjoyment.  

willow weaving

“These coloured stems are always a favourite with flower arrangers and florists at this time of year when other foliage is past its best.  “

coloured willow stems

Coloured stems in a vase just keep on giving

First is their contrasting stem colours, then (in the vase with water and the heat of the house) they will develop buds (the white buds on the dark stems are lovely), leaves (fresh vibrant green) and lastly flowers.  When I’m done they will have rooted easily in the water and I can then replant them. For me that is sustainable local flowers and stems!

willow bud

Twisted coloured willow ring/Christmas wreath

I will also make a twisted willow ring or wreath, ( I mentioned this in a previous post), the colours remain vibrant over the winter and slowly over time.  I then use the previous winter’s willow ring as the basic structure to make my Christmas wreath which is covered with with winter flowers (such as viburnum) and evergreen foliage collected from my garden.

wreath

Coloured willow and dog wood stems for your garden

The thicker stems of my prunings may be stuck into the ground in a damp spot in my garden or woodland.  This is the time of year to do it (when the plant is dormant) and they will grow away in the Spring (although they do grow better if kept weed free whilst establishing themselves).  The decorative willow is not as vibrant in growth as the superwillow that we grow elsewhere on the smallholding for firewood, wattles, and living willow structures.  This means that the decorative willow produces fine shoots and branches suitable for the vase or weaving.  To ensure vibrancy and suitable shoots every year the willow does require to be harvested or coppiced.  This  keeps the willow at a good visual height and size and ensures a fresh growth of young colourful stems every winter.

The many uses of willow

willow cuttings

Finally, it is also a great source of pollen and nectar for the bees and insects in the spring.  

All of the above are for sale at fifesmallholder – please visit our shop

 coloured willow wreath

 Click here for another post on things to make with willow.

Why not check out my Willow Board on Pinterest for lots of ideas and tips on things to make with willow?

 

Nov 272012
 
tup and ram lamb at fifesmallholder

Its tupping time at Fifesmallholder

We have been a bit later putting our boys in with our girls this year.  There has been two bad winters in a row previously and an April lambing will hopefully mean that the lambs get a better start in life.  We do not bring our sheep in for lambing, but keep them out in the lambing field and bring them in once lambing is  immenent or they have just lambed.  We do not have a large lambing shed and have found that this method means that shelter is given when they need it the most.  However, if the weather is bad then we need to make sure that the pregnant ewes have sufficient shelter and feed.

It is a good idea to make sure that both boys (known as a tup or ram) and girls (known as a ewe) are in peak condition.

Flush The Ewes

 To improve the chances of twins, you can help the ewe produce more eggs at ovulation. To do this you can put the ewes on fresh grazing for a few days/weeks along with a mineral lick, this will give the ewe a boost in condition. Usually resulting in an increase in eggs ovulated… which hopefully means twins or triplets.

How Often Is A Female Sheep Fertile?

A ewe will come in season every 21 days until she has conceived. I advise that you put a marking raddle/harness on your Ram. Every 21 days you should change the colour of the crayon. Doing this will allow you take note of what period the ewe will lamb in and help you organise things (holidays, help etc).

How long is a female sheep or ewe pregnant for?

The ewes gestation period is typically 147 days. Allow 145-149 days and you will be safe.  A common saying is if you put your tup in on 5th November you can expect lambs from the 1st April.

* Tip – make sure this years ewe lambs are well away from all this mullarkey – otherwise you might end up with a teenage mother*

This Is What They Have Been Waiting All Year For

Make sure your ram/tup is in good condition at tupping time”

Your tups need to be firing on all cylinders! Peak fitness is essential, the most common reason for a lazy tup will be poor feet. Keep them trimmed and tidy. We have two proven tups (producing good healthy lambs last year) but it is always good to be prepared for any eventuality by having an heir and a spare.  They keep each other company throughout the summer, and mean that I have a mix of genes in my lambs, a backup in case one of them gets sick, and a guarantee that at least one of them will perform.  

For me lambing is the best time on the smallholding and I look forward to it every year.

 November 27, 2012  autumn, employment, income, livestock, post archive, sheep Tagged with: , , , , , , , , ,
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